Breweries in New Brunswick

As of April 1st, 2014 there were 9 New Brunswick owned and operated breweries making beer in the province.

Domestic/Regional Breweries: 1
Large/Medium Microbreweries (brewing on 5bbl+ system): 2 (including 1 brewpub)
Small Microbreweries: 6 (including 1 brewpub)
Breweries in planning: 3

Domestic/Regional

Moosehead Breweries Ltd. – Saint John

Moosehead is not only New Brunswick’s, but also Canada’s largest and oldest independently owned and operated brewing company, dating back to Confederation (1867). It carries close to a dozen different brands, but is most recognized for the green-bottled Moosehead Lager, which is shipped the world over. In the Maritimes, Alpine Lager, another multi-award winning Moosehead brew, is a staple, and “You gotta live here to get it.”

Try these beers: Moosehead Lager, Moosehead Pale Ale, Alpine Lager
Where to find: ANBL, pretty much any bar or restaurant in NB, as well as many establishments and liquor stores in NS, PEI, and parts of the rest of Canada.

Large/Medium Microbreweries

Picaroons Traditional Ales (Northampton Brewing Company) – Fredericton

Picaroons (for short) has been a Fredericton establishment for many years now, and has been winning all sorts of Canadian Brewing Awards for at least a decade. It focuses on English-style ales ranging from bitters to dry stouts. They have a “Brewtique” on Queen Street in Fredericton where you can fill growlers, and buy bottles and merchandise.

Try these beers: Best Bitter, Yippee IPA, Timber Hog Stout, Winter Warmer (winter months only, but an excellent example of the style).
Where to find: Most ANBL stores in the province (excepting some tiny agency stores), Picaroons Brewtique (422 Queen Street), many finer restaurants and bars across the province, some NSLC stores, as well as the occasional restaurant in PEI and Newfoundland. Picaroons is probably the most widely distributed microbrewery in the province.

Pump House Brewery – Moncton

Another big CBA’s winner, Pump House will be celebrating 15 years of pours in September of 2014. Pump House focuses on both German and English style beers, making a German lager, scotch ale, bitter, and many others. The brewpub at 5 Orange Lane in Moncton makes great wood-fired pizzas, and has the biggest variety of their brews (including beers that aren’t bottled at all) that range in sizes from 4 ounces to a 3 litre boot!

Try these beers: Premium Lager, Special Old Bitter, Blueberry Ale (sometimes served with blueberries)
Where to find: Most corporate ANBL stores, Pump House Brewpub (5 Orange Lane), many finer restaurants and bars throughout the province, as well as some bars and liquor stores in Nova Scotia and PEI.

Small Microbreweries

Big Tide Brewing Company – Saint John

The only other brewpub in New Brunswick. Big Tide makes a variety of English-style beers for their brewpub, which also acts as a growler take-out. Located in the heart of Saint John, it’s a great stop if you’re on Princess street and want to sit down and have a beer and play snakes and ladders on one of their board game imprinted tables.

Try these beers: Fogbound Hemp Pale Ale, Benedict Arnold ESB
Where to find: The only reliable place you’ll find Big Tide’s beers is directly at their brewpub at 47 Princess Street.

Shiretown Beer – Charlo

A nanobrewery at the northern-most part of New Brunswick. After relocating from Campbellton down to the road to Charlo in 2013, Shiretown started selling their beers out of ANBL stores across the province. Pretty impressive considering both their location and that they brew on a little Sabco and hand-cap all their beer.

Try these beers: Blonde du Quai
Where to find: ANBL stores in the larger cities in NB, Shiretown Brewery (and Heron’s Nest Cottages – it’s the same location) at 6 Heron’s Nest street in Charlo, certain restaurants in northern NB, King Street Ale House in Fredericton.

Grimross Brewing Co. – Fredericton

Grimross celebrates a year of beer on July 1, 2014. Owner-brewer Stephen Dixon focuses on Belgian-style ales, and the beers are only available in Fredericton. Picaroons has been generous enough to let him brew right out of their Brewtique, which is also the only place you can go to buy his beer in 1L swing-top growler form.

Try these beers: Belgian Rye IPA, Ben’s Bitter Pale Ale
Where to find: Picaroons Brewtique, King Street Ale House

Acadie-Broue – Moncton

The oldest nano-brewery on the list is also probably the hardest one to get your hands on. Brewer-owner Patrice Godin works full-time as a chemist, but when he’s time for his hobby, he can make some mean beers, and has remarkably even won a few CBA’s. Most of Acadie Broue’s beers are European influenced, ranging from German Berliner Weissebiers to Belgian Saisons. Unless you find him at a festival, you’ll have to go to Moncton to (hopefully) find Patrice’s beer.

Try these beers: whatever is pouring, the list always rotates.
Where to find: Marky’s Laundromat in Moncton is the only place that carries Acadie-Broue

Celtic Knot – Moncton

The other Moncton nanobrewery is a lot younger a little easier to get (not much). Celtic Knot gets inspiration from English and American styles, and focus on some bigger, more flavourful beers. Again, you’ll have to go to Moncton to try the beer.

Try these beers: Hopicide IPA, Dark Passage Oatmeal Stout
Where to find: Marky’s Laundromat, Tide and Boar Gastropub

Hammond River Brewing – Quispamsis

Owner/brewer Shane Steeves has been brewing for years, but this winter the province gave him a licence that effectively made his basement a commercial micro-brewery. Now he shares four beers between four bars in the greater Saint John area. The beers range in style, but have some distinctly American hop presence.

Try these beers: Red Coat India Red Ale, Hop Flash IPA
Where to find: Saint John Ale House, Bourbon Quarter Restaurant, Shiretown Publicans, Barrel’s Head Gastropub

Breweries in Planning

Les Brasseurs du Petit-Sault – Edmunston

Railcar Brewing Company – Florenceville-Bristol

Big Axe Brewery and B&B

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